Meet Robb Kulin, one of twelve new astronauts selected for NASA’s astronaut candidate class of 2017

video source: Space.com

One audacious SpaceX employee was one of 12 candidates selected for NASA’s astronaut class of 2017. He is now incredibly excited to go wherever his adventure in space will take him.

Robb Kulin is an engineer from Anchorage, Alaska, 33 years old, and has spent six and a half years being a senior manager for flight reliability at the private spaceflight company SpaceX. Prior to that, he was an ice driller in Antartica.

Kulin is prepared to take on the last frontier as part of NASA’s latest group of astronauts, who will be picked to fly to the International Space Station and later on deep-space missions with NASA’s new Orion spacecraft. Orion is set to launch as early as 2019 on the New Space Launch System rocket. The astronauts will complete two years of training at Johnson Space Center located at Houston before getting to reach their dream of being in space.

Different from many other kids that greatest dream is to become astronaut, Kulin mentioned that he did not desired to pursue a career in spaceflight until he reach graduate school, when he and his friend watched NASA’s space shuttle launch from Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

Robb Kulin

New NASA Astronaut, Robb Kulin.

Kulin said, “While we were at one of the launches, a friend of a friend said, ‘Hey, let’s go check out the launchpad that my company, SpaceX, is building out at Launch Complex 40,'” located not far from Cafe Canaveal.

He added, “When I went there, I really wasn’t interested in SpaceX at all. I’d kind of laughed at some of the falcon 1 anomalies and didn’t really understand what they were trying to accomplish. But once I went there and met some of the other engineers working on building this pad — how energetic they were, the great responsibility that they were given and the hands-on work that they got to do — they really inspired me to want to fly.””

Kulin thinks that it is essential for people to push for bigger goals, like landing on Mars and becoming an interplanetary species.



By | 2017-10-13T18:07:05+00:00 June 13th, 2017|Space|